Costuming

/Costuming

Ghostbusters Project: Prepping the shell

So, a while back, I finally received my beautiful Nick-a-tron fiberglass proton pack hero kit.

At the core, the basic shell is what I’d use to work from, but even though it is amazing, there is still a lot of work to do on it!

First off, I drilled out part of the holes used for the lights in the cyclotron. (it is these holes here thad I already had done a quick drill through with my step drill.)

As you see, they are far from perfect, but I had planned to spend a little time with the shell and my trusty dremel!

Armed with a sanding drum, I went ahead and sanded those round.

It is a pretty messy work, so it is definitely recommended to do this outside. Also recommended is to wear some sort of dust protector or rebreather. VERY recommended, in fact.

We had one of our first really sunny nice days outside in a long while, so it was perfect to spend a little time on the shell while my wife had a friend over and Emma played with her daughter in the mean time.

Once sanding was done, it was time to put on the cutting wheel and cut open the slot where the blue LED’s are going to be in the future. A steady hand and going slow made for a pretty decent result.

I also spent a little time removing some of the artefacts from the casting process to get my shell as good as can be. I will still need to bondo and sand parts of it more, but at least I have started.

During the evening, I also found a little time to plan for where I would place the N-filter… I think. I marked it out with a sharpie after gently scratching the outside of the N-filter into gel coat with a scalpel. If I end up moving it, a little bondo will cover these marks without issues before painting.

I also ended up making a holder for the split loom (the hose going to the gun portion) that is not exactly 100% screen accurate, but it will hold the loom in place wonderfully. I 3d printed this out of reinforced PLA. (Normal PLA would do, but I had reinforced PLA loaded, so it will be nice and sturdy.)

I designed this a while back before actually having the split loom in hand, so a few minor modifications was needed… and it ens up holding the loom perfectly.

My plan is to to put threaded brass inserts into the bottom portion, allowing me to use M3 bolts to hold it together and have no fatigue in the plastic.

More to come another day! 😀

By | March 20th, 2017|3D Printing, Costuming, Ghostbusters|Comments Off on Ghostbusters Project: Prepping the shell

Ghostbusters Project: Modifying the Clippard

One of the features on both the proton pack and the thrower (the “gun” if you will) on the Ghostbusters costume from 1984, is a Clippard Valve. It is apparently used for something in the real world. In the Ghostbusters world, it is a thing that looks cool.

A while back, I 3d printed a copy of a clippard to keep on my proton pack to keep the weight down, and sitting right next to the real deal, it looks pretty good!

The twist knob still needs a little more work, but I’ve got a resin copy of that coming in, but what I’m devoting THIS post to, is modifying the original Clippard (The one that is supposed to go on the gun) to work as a volume controller for my proton pack.

After first opening the clippard and taking it apart, removing everything on the inside, I had to first saw off the round tab on the bottom  and drill a hole, allowing the cable to run through.

I also 3d designed a huge spacer/holder for the potentiometer that was to be placed inside the clippard.

I needed to cut down the pins on the potentiometer in order to make it fit properly, and once it was cut down and the wires were soldered, this what I was left with.

In the picture you can also see a spacer that I threaded and had screwed in place, and blue painters tape on the threads and rotary part of the potentiometer. You’ll see why shortly…

To make sure I had enough room for the solder joints, I drilled out the top of the inside of the Clippard with a stepper drill, just to give some more space. The enclosure will be held in place 6 mm further down where the inside diameter will match the 3d printed enclosure perfectly.

The potentiometer fit like a glove into my 3d printed enclosure.

Pushed down into the Clippard with the cable going out through the hole I drilled in the bottom:

When I started to put the clippard together, the thin axel of the potentiometer didn’t exactly look like the original… so I had to do something here. I took the original threaded part that was hooked up to the clippard and the rotary knob, and put it in my power drill with a metal blade to cut off a small piece.

It was still larger than the potentiometer on the inside, so a few turns with painters tape was just right to center the brass bit.

Finally, attaching the knob at the top again, and I now have a potentiometer for the volume built into my Thrower Clippard!

Can’t wait to actually fit this on my pack in the (hopefully) near future.

By | January 5th, 2017|Ghostbusters|Comments Off on Ghostbusters Project: Modifying the Clippard

Why 3d printing IS a good tool when making props… if done correctly.

I must say that after a long hiatus, it feels good to be back to doing some actual building again.

The break was, of course, due to my daughters health, and even though the path to get her well again is long and uncertain, We still need to find these things in our lives that gives us strength, that gives us peace of mind and the energy to move on through these dark times.

For me, that meant taking on another project. I’m going to be a Ghostbuster!

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(Costume still in progress)

Ever since I was 11 years old and went with my father to see this movie back in 1984, there’s been something about it that I’ve always cherished and held dear to me. A few years back I was happy to borrow a uniform and proton pack for the annual Sci-Fi convention in Stockholm and it was nothing short of awesome. Time to make my own!

The picture above is a work in progress of the costume. I am still awaiting arrival of my belt, but the rest of the gadgets that go on the suit have arrived… I just haven’t pictured them yet!

But, I digress. Apart from drawing and printing the hose connector (grey thing that holds the yellow hose) on the uniform, I’ve started to draw and print some of the things that go on the proton pack and gun… not to mention the fully 3d printed trap …

On the proton pack, I need to have what’s known as a Clippard Valve. I decided to make one on my printer. First off: time for some cad:

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First print off the bed was not as smooth as I wanted, due to some of my export settings not being fine tuned enough for the circular top. I exported and printed a second one that was slightly smoother, but kept this for reference. It is a good reference of what a raw 3d print looks like, even when printed in good quality.

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What I don’t get is this: Many people that 3d print parts for costumes or gadgets never put in enough work with sanding and polishing the 3d prints, making them looking not good enough!

This is not going to happen with my Clippard!

I started off by sanding off the biggest irregularities, getting it fairly smooth, then a coating of spray filler … then sanding again to get it smooth.

A few places (most notably the top of the thumbscrew on the valve) was also hit with a few coats of Tamaiya Putty, to remove the print lines. Again, sanded away most of it, to get a smooth finish.

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Once sanding was done, I painted everything black. Two quick coats did the trick.

Although it is cold and freezing outside, I still painted them quickly and then used my fiancées hair drier to harden the paint just enough so I could bring them inside without smelling the place up.

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I then masked the top portion away and clear coated the majority of the body of the valve.

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My plan was to use Silver Leaf Rub and Buff for the metal part of the top of the valve, and as experience have shown me, this does not stick well on clear coated surfaces, but on raw painted surfaces, it fit just great! I also treated the top screw with Rub and Buff.

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Once that was finished, all that was left was to add a metal sticker on top of it, to create my finished valve. Please note that in the pic below are two different types of valves, so they should look slightly different. The one on the left was my 3d printed version.

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And … as a final comparison, here are the final result compared to the 3d printed raw print. The knurling on the screw could be slightly better, but it is only really visible when being very close to the valve, and I am giving you the full horror here…

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All in all, I am happy with the results, and this baby weighs just a few grams as opposed to the original, which ways about 100 times more. Every gram counts when you wear it on your back!

I will be back shortly with more about this new exciting project!

cheers,

Micke

By | December 6th, 2016|Ghostbusters|Comments Off on Why 3d printing IS a good tool when making props… if done correctly.

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