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Ghostbusters Project: The first money shot

A couple of minor updates within the last few days, that in itself were not big enough to warrant a blog post, but now..

First off, I took the daring step of drilling hole in my shell for the split loom. I had previously 3d printed a loom holder, and it was time to jump off the cliff..

I marked off where the loom would pass through the shell, and step drilled the hole up to 30mm, which was the diameter of my holder, then used my dremel to cut down from the half circle to the bottom of the shell.

A little sanding and filing, and it turned out pretty good.

Can’t wait for my proper motherboard to arrive so I can start mounting things. I did have to bondo and sand and repaint a bit around the hole, but that was fixed as well as the bondoed piece on the right.

In addition to this, I got a new shipment of fun pieces. Not all of these are accurate, but to my defense, I ordered some of these prior to finding the proper ones.

Having almost all pieces in place, I decided it was time for my first pic with placement of most parts.

I still intend to replace most resin parts with aluminium, but until I have them, the resin parts will do.

It was about here I found how wonky some parts of the shell is. The upper left corner where the ion arm is supposed to sit had a height difference of 3 mm from the corner to the inner corner of the ion arm placement. I had to balance the resin ion arm (that I had sanded flat) on an m3 nut on the inner corner for it to not fall down.

To fix this, I decided to mask off parts of that shell, sand down the highest points and add loctite putty to build up a base. It took me about 45 minutes to fix, but the result was pretty good.

You can clearly see the bulk that was build up. Dry fitting with the ion arm leaves this:

Nice and flat!

The shell went out on the balcony for a bit of touch up on the hammerite black paint, and once that’s dry, most of the shell work should be done.

I also hot glued in my coloured lenses for the power bar and the cyclotron…

… only to realize that I have RGB LED’s in my light pack, and the program does four different colours, so I had to cut them off. Oh well 🙂

I also took out the metal parts and the black glossy plastic box of my 3d printed ghost trap, courtesy of countspatula and went over them with flat black before assembling again.

I have built in a remote control in my pedal to not have to use the hose for anything functional at all, and I decided to also wire up the LED on the remote to a small LED on the pedal. It is not very bright, but a nice little addition, I think.

 

By | 2017-04-14T16:53:59+00:00 April 14th, 2017|Building, Costuming, Ghostbusters Proton Pack, Stormtrooper|Comments Off on Ghostbusters Project: The first money shot

Why 3d printing IS a good tool when making props… if done correctly.

I must say that after a long hiatus, it feels good to be back to doing some actual building again.

The break was, of course, due to my daughters health, and even though the path to get her well again is long and uncertain, We still need to find these things in our lives that gives us strength, that gives us peace of mind and the energy to move on through these dark times.

For me, that meant taking on another project. I’m going to be a Ghostbuster!

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(Costume still in progress)

Ever since I was 11 years old and went with my father to see this movie back in 1984, there’s been something about it that I’ve always cherished and held dear to me. A few years back I was happy to borrow a uniform and proton pack for the annual Sci-Fi convention in Stockholm and it was nothing short of awesome. Time to make my own!

The picture above is a work in progress of the costume. I am still awaiting arrival of my belt, but the rest of the gadgets that go on the suit have arrived… I just haven’t pictured them yet!

But, I digress. Apart from drawing and printing the hose connector (grey thing that holds the yellow hose) on the uniform, I’ve started to draw and print some of the things that go on the proton pack and gun… not to mention the fully 3d printed trap …

On the proton pack, I need to have what’s known as a Clippard Valve. I decided to make one on my printer. First off: time for some cad:

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First print off the bed was not as smooth as I wanted, due to some of my export settings not being fine tuned enough for the circular top. I exported and printed a second one that was slightly smoother, but kept this for reference. It is a good reference of what a raw 3d print looks like, even when printed in good quality.

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What I don’t get is this: Many people that 3d print parts for costumes or gadgets never put in enough work with sanding and polishing the 3d prints, making them looking not good enough!

This is not going to happen with my Clippard!

I started off by sanding off the biggest irregularities, getting it fairly smooth, then a coating of spray filler … then sanding again to get it smooth.

A few places (most notably the top of the thumbscrew on the valve) was also hit with a few coats of Tamaiya Putty, to remove the print lines. Again, sanded away most of it, to get a smooth finish.

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Once sanding was done, I painted everything black. Two quick coats did the trick.

Although it is cold and freezing outside, I still painted them quickly and then used my fiancées hair drier to harden the paint just enough so I could bring them inside without smelling the place up.

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I then masked the top portion away and clear coated the majority of the body of the valve.

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My plan was to use Silver Leaf Rub and Buff for the metal part of the top of the valve, and as experience have shown me, this does not stick well on clear coated surfaces, but on raw painted surfaces, it fit just great! I also treated the top screw with Rub and Buff.

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Once that was finished, all that was left was to add a metal sticker on top of it, to create my finished valve. Please note that in the pic below are two different types of valves, so they should look slightly different. The one on the left was my 3d printed version.

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And … as a final comparison, here are the final result compared to the 3d printed raw print. The knurling on the screw could be slightly better, but it is only really visible when being very close to the valve, and I am giving you the full horror here…

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All in all, I am happy with the results, and this baby weighs just a few grams as opposed to the original, which ways about 100 times more. Every gram counts when you wear it on your back!

I will be back shortly with more about this new exciting project!

cheers,

Micke

By | 2016-12-06T00:44:35+00:00 December 6th, 2016|Ghostbusters|Comments Off on Why 3d printing IS a good tool when making props… if done correctly.

BB8 Dome nearing completion

I hurried putting my dome for BB-8 together for the Sci Fi convention in mid September. This included doing a quick (and not nearly good enough) paint job to just get the dome to some sort of colour.

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The paint was too thick in places, and I had not had enough time to do a proper job concealing the joints. You can really see the joint on the left hand side of the picture quite clearly.

I also had no time to really let the paint dry before I hit it with the clear coat, so it all sort of blended together. Not to mention the ugly skirt..

To fix the skirt and the dome ring, I needed to print new parts, something I have done and are still in the process of assembling.

Paint job being botched (and no orange) aside, it still looked pretty cool!

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Not to mention the extreme close-up .. 2001 warning ahead:

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This got me through the Sci Fi convention, even though it was just a base.

Being back home, I sanded the clear coat and most of the paint off, worked over some of the problem areas with some putty filler, sanded again, and then applied 3 coats of spray filler, before sanding it down AGAIN with 400 grit sand paper to a very smooth finish, before I applied the white paint again. No more problem areas, and no more visible joints!

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Once the dome was white (again) and the paint had cured, I taped over the entire dome, and cut out the portions that was going to be orange, and then hit the dome with the brand new orange paint I had custom ordered.

Once cured, the dome looks GREAT!

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After the paint had cured properly, it was time to hit it with the clear coat.

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The dome feels incredibly smooth.

Time to buy a can of dark grey and tint the Radar Surrounds and the Holo Projector (and the Holo Projector ring) in the proper colour and mount them.

The only annoying thing is that I had made a really good PSI that should sit in the smaller hole on this picture, however, when cleaning out my workshop the other day, I suspect that small PSI that I wrote a nice blog post about, accidentally found its way out in the trash…

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Ah well, you gain some, you lose some. I have updated the 3D model for this, so next time it should be a lot easier for me to get what I need to get done!

Next up is putting some more focus on the dome ring and dome skirt so I can paint and mount them for a finalized dome structure. Can’t wait to get this part of the build done so I can start weathering the dome, I’m really looking forward to that!

By | 2016-12-06T00:00:03+00:00 October 7th, 2015|BB-8, Building|Comments Off on BB8 Dome nearing completion

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